“Passionate Ignorance”: Literary and Pedagogical Implications of Lacan’s Style

Hivren Demir Atay

Abstract


Departing from Jacques Lacan’s influence on literary and pedagogical studies, this article explores how his conceptualization of “style” informs literature and pedagogy in addition to psychoanalysis. The article suggests that Lacan’s theorization of the human subject as the “letter” of psychoanalysis shows the interminability of reading and teaching due to his description of the “letter” as the literality of the human subject. This literality points to the construction of the humans as social subjects in the symbolic register and thus marks language an indispensable element of style. Dwelling in the function of language in style, the article traces the paths Lacan takes in order to disrupt the idea of the psychoanalytic connection based on the analyst’s mastery. It concentrates on transference and what Lacan calls “passionate ignorance” in a transferential relation for the purpose of explaining how this disruption is realized. Moreover, Lacan’s own style of learning from Freud as well as his own style of teaching is discussed to further emphasize that education, like psychoanalysis and literature, should alternatively open a space for “passionate ignorance” to create the possibility of dialogic interaction.

 


Keywords


Lacan; literature; passionate ignorance; pedagogy; psychoanalysis; style

Full Text:

PDF

References


Brooks, P. (1994). Psychoanalysis and storytelling. Oxford and Cambridge: Blackwell.

Felman, S. (1977). To open the question. Yale French Studies, 55-56, 5-10.

Felman, S. (1982). Pyschoanalysis and education: Teaching terminable and interminable. Yale French Studies, 63, 21-44.

Freud, S. (1953). The interpretation of dreams. In J. Strachey (Ed. and Trans.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud (Vol. 4&5, pp. 1-723). London: Hogarth Press. (Original work published 1900)

Freud, S. (1958). The dynamics of transference. In J. Strachey (Ed. and Trans.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud (Vol. 12, pp. 97-108). London: Hogarth Press, (Original work published 1912).

Freud, S. (1958). Observations on transference love. In J. Strachey (Ed. and Trans.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud (Vol. 12, pp. 157-173). London: Hogarth Press, (Original work published 1915).

Freud, S. (1959). The question of lay analysis. In J. Strachey (Ed. and Trans.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud (Vol. 20, pp. 179-258). London: Hogarth Press, (Original work published 1926).

Freud, S. (1961). Fragment of an analysis of a case of hysteria. In J. Strachey (Ed. and Trans.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud (Vol. 7, pp. 7-122.). London: Hogarth Press. (Original work published 1905)

Freud, S. (1964). Analysis terminable and interminable. In J. Strachey (Ed. and Trans.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud (Vol. 23, pp. 209-253). London: Hogarth Press, (Original work published 1937).

Gallop, J. (1985). Reading Lacan. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.

Johnson, B. (1985). Teaching deconstructively. In (Eds. G. Douglas Atkins & M. L. Johnson). Writing and Reading Differently. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 140-48.

Lacan, J. (1978). The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis. (A. Sheridan, Trans.). New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company.

Lacan, J. (1988a). Freud’s Papers on Technique. (J. Forrester, Trans.). New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company.

Lacan, J. (1988b). The Ego in Freud’s Theory and in the Technique of Psychoanalysis. (S. Tomaselli, Trans.). New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company.

Lacan, J. (1999). On Feminine Sexuality: The Limits of Love and Knowledge (B. Fink, Trans.). New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company.

Lacan. J, (2006a). Aggressiveness in psychoanalysis. In (B. Fink, Trans.) Écrits (pp. 82-101). New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company.

Lacan, J. (2006b). Overture to this collection. In (B. Fink, Trans.) Écrits (pp. 3-5). New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company.

Lacan, J. (2006c). Presentation on transference. In (B. Fink, Trans.) Écrits (pp. 176-189). New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company.

Lacan, J. (2006d). Seminar on ‘The Purloined Letter.’ In (B. Fink, Trans.) Écrits (pp. 6-48). New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company.

Lacan, J. (2006e). The instance of the letter in the unconscious, or reason since Freud. In (B. Fink, Trans.) Écrits (pp. 412-45). New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company.

Lacan, J. (2006f). The mirror stage as formative of the function as revealed in psychoanalytic Experience. In (B. Fink, Trans.) Écrits (pp. 75-82). New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company.

Lacan, J. (2008). My Teaching (D. Macey, Trans.). London and New York: Verso.

Mellard, J. (1991). Using Lacan, reading fiction. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press.

Nancy. J. & Lacoue-Labarthe, P. (1992). The title of the letter: A reading of Lacan (F. Raffoul & D. Pettigrew, Trans.). Albany: State University of New York Press.

Ragland-Sullivan, E. (1986). Jacques Lacan and the philosophy of psychoanalysis. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press.

Stoltzfus, B. (1996). Lacan and literature: Purloined pretexts. Albany: State University of New York Press.


Comments on this article

View all comments


...open to be different...

Other Education works in association with the following partners: http://www.othereducation.org/public/site/images/hel1/yorksj_logo_120

and is sponsored by the silence and mindfulness App Calm Me Down http://www.othereducation.org/public/site/images/hel1/google_play_icon_85

Please see copyright notice at the end of each published work for specifics.


ISSN: 2049-2162 © Other Business Ltd, 2012-2017. Other Education™ is a not-for-profit trading entity of Other Business Ltd whose registered office is: Bernard Rogers Accounting, Bank Gallery, High Street, Kenilworth. Registered in England: 08567212