Special Issue Guest Editorial: Literary Visions—Exploring Education Through the Lens of Literature

  • Catherine Samiei York St John University
Keywords: Educational alternatives, progressive education, alternative education, difference, educational theory, educational philosophy

Abstract

This special interest issue of Other Education: The Journal of Educational Alternatives emerged from a desire to explore the ways in which literature can provide alternative ways of imaging and practising education.

        From dystopias to utopias, literature can provide insights into the past, present and future of education. The aim of the special issue is to engage with wider questions around the purpose of education, the ways in which education is imagined, and the potential of literature to reshape educational thinking. We take as our starting point the notion that literary representations of schools and education and the use of literature in education operate as important creative and imaginative spaces. Literature can provide a critical distance and space to ‘speak the unspeakable’ or to act as sites of dialogue to foreground tensions and offer challenges to existing practices....

References

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Published
2018-10-16
Section
SI Editorial